Tag Archives: malware

Five endpoint threats affecting small businesses | Avast Business

Endpoints are an easy target for hackers, so it’s essential that small businesses protect themselves. Connected employees, vulnerable software and weak antivirus all contribute to this being a favorite target of hackers. And, as the list below details, there are many types of cyberattacks that target endpoints, from phishing to malvertising.

The essential guide to ransomware and how to protect yourself

Cybersecurity is a major concern in today’s world, both at the corporate and personal levels. Our computers, our handheld devices, and our smart home and IoT products are vulnerable to a variety of attacks. In 2017 alone, Avast blocked 35 billion security attacks against PCs and 208 million against Android mobile devices. What was one of the biggest security threats? Ransomware.

2018 Resolution: Keep Your Tech, and Yourself, Up to Date

As we enter 2018, I encourage everyone to include a simple resolution on their list: make sure you are well-informed about the technology you use, and avoid getting swept up in false narratives and exaggerated claims about its dangers. Let me be clear: there are genuine threats, but they don’t come from the technology itself. As I always say, technology is agnostic. The dangers come from the bad actors that are willing to use any tool at their disposal, including those in cyberspace, to do harm. Our real target should be combating these forces, not demonizing this or that latest technological development. Education about the realities of our digital world is the best antidote against misplaced fears. And, conveniently, it is also the best way to inoculate ourselves against the security issues that technology does indeed pose.

Looking ahead: 9 threat trends in 2018

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Cyberattacks are continuing to increase in number and severity every year, and 2018 will be no exception. We believe that many of the threats we observed in 2017 will, unfortunately, appear in evolved forms this year to continue threatening our busines…

Three easy steps to stay clear of ransomware in 2018

In 2017, Avast blocked more than 122 million WannaCry attacks, the infamous ransomware that caused tears to be shed around the globe. That attack, along with the Petna and Bad Rabbit ransomware attacks, cost consumers and businesses around the world more than 5 billion dollars. Without a doubt, ransomware was the year’s biggest threat. And this terrible trend will unfortunately continue rising in 2018.

Downloaders on Google Play spreading malware to steal Facebook login details

Multiple downloaders, malicious apps that download further malicious apps to infected devices, have made it onto the Google Play Store. The downloaders are capable of downloading further apps that pose as system apps, some of which are capable of steal…

Locky’s JavaScript downloader

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Locky is a considerable security threat that is now widely spread.

It seems that Locky’s authors are now predominately using one campaign to spread the ransomware. Last week, we published a blog post about Locky Ransomware, the ransomware that is most likely being spread by the infamous Dridex botnet. In our last blog post, we described three campaigns the Locky authors are using to spread their malware. Now Locky’s authors are mainly using the campaign with javascript packed into a zip file sent to people through phishing emails.

A closer look at the Locky ransomware

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Today, we bring you a deep look into the latest ransomware called Locky. This new file encryptor, targeting PC users, has most likely been created by authors of the well-known Dridex botnet and is spread the same way.

Locky uses all “top class” features, such as a domain generation algorithm, custom encrypted communication, TOR/BitCoin payment, strong RSA-2048+AES-128 file encryption and can encrypt over 160 different file types, including virtual disks, source codes and databases.

We monitored the Locky family this past month and discovered a second variant of the malware, which has new features and program code improvements. Locky’s authors added a new hard-coded seed to the domain generation algorithm, which allows them to deactivate Locky on Russian PCs.

Infection vector

Locky is spreading via spam email campaigns that are similar to those used by the Dridex botnet. They use similar file names, obfuscation, email content and structure of download URLs.

We have observed three different campaign versions of Locky and have described them below.

Below is an example of one of the spam emails. The emails are designed to make people believe they were sent from large companies such as Nordstrom, Symantec and Crown Holdings.

May the force, but not the malware, be with you!

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Not very long ago, in a galaxy not far away, a group of cybercriminals decided to take advantage of the Star Wars effect to spread malware among the most impatient fans. A lot of people cannot wait to see Star Wars: The Force Awakens, and that’s something cybercrooks know. That’s why a lot of links […]