Tag Archives: #popular

Things we have learned about Petna, the Petya-based malware

Earlier this week, we saw another mass ransomware attack happen, less than two months after the WannaCry outbreak. In the hours and days after the attack, this strain was given many different names, including Petya, Petna, NotPetya, EternalPetya, Nyetya, and many more. We originally referred to it as Petya-based, but for simplicity, let’s call it Petna.

Petya-based ransomware using EternalBlue to infect computers around the world

Further to reports of a massive cyber attack hitting a number of companies in Ukraine, including banks, energy companies and transport services as well as the government, we believe this is another example of the Petya-based ransomware, which was first…

WannaCry WannaBe targeting Android smartphones

Avast is now detecting mobile ransomware, which we will refer to as “WannaLocker” from now on. The ransomware is targeting Chinese Android users. WannaLocker’s ransom message screen may look familiar to you and that’s because it looks just like the WannaCry ransomware screen, the ransomware that spread like wildfire around the world mid-May. Another interesting aspect is that WannaLocker encrypts files on the infected device’s external storage, something we haven’t seen since Simplocker in 2014.WannaLocker ransom message.jpg

Meet Adylkuzz: cryptocurrency mining malware spreading using the same exploit as WannaCry

WannaCry, the worst ransomware outbreak in history, gained a lot of media attention, but WannaCry isn’t the only malware strain spreading on a massive scale. One of them is Adylkuzz, a cryptocurrency miner, that has been infecting PCs around the world, just like WannaCry.

WannaCry Update – The Worst Ransomware Outbreak in History

While last Friday wasn’t Friday the 13th, it sure seemed like it. PCs around the world, including those belonging to hospitals and government agencies, were hit by the WannaCry (AKA WanaCrypt0r, or WCry) ransomware, causing chaos. Up until now we have seen more than 250,000 detections in 116 countries. About 15% of our more than 400 million users worldwide haven’t patched the MS17-010 vulnerability, which could have made them vulnerable to this attack, if they didn’t have Avast protecting them.